Video: Why Your Horse Should Wear Boots

This video is a scientific look horses and their anatomy.  It is very informational and shows why your horse should be wearing boots.

Note:  This Video is Graphic, but also very informative.  This entire video is worth watching, but if you are pressed for time, watch minutes 17-19.  This will show what happens when they over reach and hit their front tendon and why it’s so important for them to be wearing boots.

Share

12 Responses

  1. Anonymous

    Disclaimer: I did not yet watch the video.

    But having seen a horse trip on its own galloping boots last month, falling to the ground on top of her rider, and gravely injuring the rider, I would have to say use boots ONLY when necessary. NOT EVERY HORSE SHOULD WEAR BOOTS.

    Reply
    • Kait

      A couple things… Watch the video and be sure your boots fit correctly. That’s all I can say.

      Reply
    • H4CRanch

      I agree a horse doesn’t need to wear boots all the time. I put boots on my horse along with splint boots for more support of the leg when I am in competition. When I am practicing it depends on how hard I am working my horse for the day.

      Reply
    • Horsey crazy (uhm, actually, just crazy too)

      Havent watched the video, but it does say “when they over reach”, not all horses over reach……

      Reply
    • Anonymous

      Horses shouldn’t trip over boots. If the horse tripped over its boots, they probably weren’t on correctly.

      Reply
  2. Tom Ballard

    Obviously, those who comment in this video have spent more time in the lab than they have training horses. Much of the video is nonsense. I’ve owned and trained thousands of thoroughbred racehorses over the years and I believe three of them wore boots.

    Reply
  3. Monica Dean

    Specifically the point: too many racehorses die from fractures ultimately caused by overreaching at those high speeds. How many of those deaths could have been prevented?
    For those of us who don’t gallop with the accompanying stress on tendons, boots may not be necessary. But for racehorses, why wouldn’t you take that extra measure of precaution?
    It’s like saying I don’t wear a helmet because thousands of people don’t and never have an accident. Duh.
    And of course, the boots should be perfectly fitted onto the individual horse to ensure safety.
    I thought this video was incredible. Hard to watch the autopsy, but it was all really, really interesting and informative. Thanks.

    Reply
    • From a practicing equine veterinarian, surgeon and orthopedic researcher

      First, proper and judicious use of boots will protect from overreaching injuries to the skin and tendons at the back of the cannon area. They also protect the inside of the limb for horses who interfere. But, racehorses absolutely do not fracture due to overreaching. And for the most part, boots do not support the weight of the horse substantially to protect tendons and ligaments from injury. In fact, damage due to overheating of tendon may be part of how tendons get injured, and boots may make this worse. This is still being researched, though.

      Reply
    • Sandy Wallis

      Although most thoroughbred race horses do not wear boots, almost all of them gallop with polo bandages which serve the same purpose as boots. Racing in boots or any bandages but Vet wrap (and possibly ace bandages- although no one uses them anymore) is illegal. That rule should probably be looked into. Standardbreds race successfully in a huge variety of boots, including elbow boots and knee boots. If Standardbreds can wear boots successfully in a race, I don’t know why TBs, Qhs, and other running race horses cannot.

      Reply
  4. Kelly Bailey

    Having worked with Standardbred racehorses for years, I’m pretty confident that were it not for the splint boots, knee boots, shin boots, speedy cuts, scalpers and bell boots used in our sport, the injuries would have been devastating to most. I had a trotter who needed elbow boots (too much action in front) so to slow him down in front it meant he interfered behind….shin boots with speedy cuts over vet wrap was the only way to protect him (He was 2 yr old trotter of the year in Penn btw)

    Standardbreds in particular tend to have more interference issues than other breeds given the high speeds at which they travel on the trot or the pace….protecting those precious legs is very important. I’d rather use a boot for 2 minutes in a race and redirect the heat later than see an animal experience a devastating injury which sidelines them for months if not forever. Just my opinion.

    Reply
  5. M.Francis

    I have been grooming show jumpers for over 20 yrs didn’t watch the video never heard or have seen a horse tripping over its boots. It’s your blacksmiths problem…end of story.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.