Watch This Bronco Dressage Horse – What Would You Do If This Was Your Horse?

This horse packs quite the buck! What would you do if this was your horse? Could you stay on a buck like that? I don’t think I could! If you think the rider did a good job, Share this on Facebook!

38 Responses

  1. Anne Moss

    This horse needs a can of whoop-ass, and this rider needs a gold medal better horses to ride.

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    • Anonymous

      this horse needed to be exercised or lunged 1st…wow what a rider to stay on him without bailing.

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  2. The guy is spurring him for fun. That's abusive.

    The guy is spurring him for fun. That’s abusive.

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    • Sue

      This rider is NOT wearing spurs!! Be careful who you call abusive! This rider is awesome.

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    • Carole Pinkerton

      you might wanna re watch the video he does not have any spurs on.

      Reply
  3. Monica

    Looks like the horse woke up with a little extra energy. I had a great mare that did this on days that she just wanted to play. Nothing wrong with a horse with spirit. Not hating his job just having a little fun. All horse owners see thing from time to time. If not while running thru the fields then while working. Looks like they are both having a good time.

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    • Caroline

      Totally agree! I had a big grey TB mare that used to do the exact same thing. Once she’d gotten it out of her system she was an absolute angel. There was never anything malicious about her, and on the one occasion when she actually got rid of me (I was riding bareback), she looked around and down at me as if to say “what are you doing down there?”. A lunge for 10 minutes in each direction was a sure fire way of it not happening at all. You could ride her on the road with cars whizzing past and she wouldn’t bat an eyelid either.

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  4. Horse mad x2

    My gelding used to do this ( now retired) when he was in unfammiliar environment or if tacked up in a rush. Working him in hand helped to combat it. If not I’d jump off turn him in a few circles and get back on. The joys of a pony with “spirit”. Top drawer to the lad managing to sit it!!!

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  5. Kowboy

    This horse is not in pain – he is having fun! These are the same moves a horse will make when turned out. He either needs more exercise, less time in his stall or a combination of the two. Great riding though!

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  6. Leslie

    Crow hopping for the most part, not stiff 4-legged hard bucks, or really mean bucking. I don’t know the horse but could be cold backed, could be fresh, could use more lunging prior to getting on. I like that the rider waited before using crop instead of inflaming the buck, then used the crop. Rider did great to keep energy moving forward, and stayed quiet!!

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      • Julie

        Cold-backed is a common term, feel free to google it:

        The term ‘cold-backed’ is used to describe a horse displaying symptoms of a sensitive or painful back. These symptoms can range from very mild, such as discomfort when the girth is tightened, to more serious, lasting until the horse has warmed up and the muscles are relaxed.

  7. Alison

    Hi. The rider did a good job of staying on BUT is adding to the horse’s problems. I think you are all missing the fundamental issues – the horse is totally jammed up and not going forward. It’s not working over it’s back at all. It’s being held on a short rein so cannot go forward and is behind the vertical. Even at the end when it starts going forward a bit, it’s tight, the space between neck and jaw is tight and restricted, and it’s on the forehand. Needs to go back to basics probably, to help it open out the jaw and reach into a contact.

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    • Julie

      I agree with you Alison. It looks like this horse would benefit greatly by being allowed to move forward. He does appear to be completely jammed up. Any horse in that situation is going to react by either kicking out as this boy did or going up to get away from the pressure. Back to basics, engage his hindquarters and let him move forward on a loose rein.

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    • Amanda

      Rider did a great job.. The horse needs to be corrected for this.. This is Unacceptable to do when its time to work.. Can do in the pasture but not at work time

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  8. Anonymous

    the original post got translated to say that the owner had been having problems with the horse bucking etc. the horse had been thoroughly checked over by the vet, and was given too this trainer to ride. this was the first time the horse had been ridden in 10 days. I think its just a habit the horse had gotten into to get the rider off, and seems to begin to settle once he knew this rider wasn’t falling off. hopefully the horse will learn to enjoy the work!!

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  9. Keeleylee

    lol… hang on ! …. wow what a rider….. excellent job of getting horse to move his feet and get past it …… he is by no means abusing the horse … just riding buck or freshness out of him… great rider!

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  10. Anonymous

    I think after sitting through all of that, the last thing going through my mind would be adjusting how the horse is carrying itself – just be thankful that there is some form of rhythm, and its a well behaved trot, moving where I ask. Adjusting the length of neck / stride / self carriage can all be worked on once the horse has settled down! I agree, looks like freshness, as any of mine would have done when turned in the field after being stuck in/not worked for longer than usual.

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    • Anonymous

      I agree. Let’s not talk about semantics. This horse needs to move forward and the trainer did a excellent job of it

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  11. Anonymous

    This is what is known as flood desensitisation. Expose the horse to an aversive stimulus at high strength (in this case a rider on his back adding aversives via the reins to the bit and the mouth of the horse as he rides) until the horse stops reacting. It is amongst the most dangerous (both in terms of physical risk and risk of accidental reinforcement) form of desensitisation and response reinforcement available and may never work to alter the behaviour of the horse. If the rider is lucky he may be able to reinforce a correct response of going forwards but if the horse finds the rider on there aversive the only way to reinforce a correct response is to get off when the horse walks, trots and canters in a relaxed way. Flood desensitising a horse to being ridden in this way would be exactly the same as strapping a person who is frightened of riding onto the back of a horse and chasing the horse around until the person relaxed, stopped crying and started to like it. Anyone want to volunteer to see how that feels?

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    • Anonymous

      I agree with you. If the horse is properly prepared from the ground, there should be no reason for this kind of bucking for an extended period of time. Sure, on a newly trained or first-time backed horse, you may get a buck or two, but if you’ve done your work as a trainer, the horse shouldn’t be doing this. It’s stressful and dangerous for both horse and rider. I do give the rider credit for staying on through all that, even if it was totally unnecessary. Just take some time to prepare the horse and you’ll end up with a better horse in the end.

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  12. basicbalanceseattrainer

    This guy does an excellent job! You guys have no clue what issue the horse came with. Perhaps he had been allowed to buck and act stupid while being lounged and took longer and longer to warm up. We don’t know. If he had gotten off it would reinforce Buck=Rider off. The buck become predictable and he rode it well. He even lost a stirrup at one point. He did not jerk the horse around or punish him and once the horse went forward, he patted him.

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  13. LouLou

    Horse looks fresh! I wouldve either turned him out or put him on the lunge line for a few minutes before getting on. Rider did an excellent job of staying on and keeping him moving forward.

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  14. Jacklyn

    That is not a dressage saddle…that is an English jumping saddle. Unless it’s called something different where I am from…

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  15. Anonymous

    First of all, I wouldn’t be riding a horse like that…he obviously needs some more groundwork or training. If I was on him and he started doing this, I’d use a one-rein stop immediately, get off, and figure out why my horse was bucking or crow-hopping and take a few steps back in the whole training process. But, kudos to the rider for staying on, that was awesome riding.

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  16. Bob Setliff

    Well all the Medical People say you are supposed to warm up and stretch the muscles before work! And that is exactly what the horse did -LOL-

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  17. Joanna

    Now this is want I call a horseman, well done he kept calm and the horse eventually calmed down also 10/10

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  18. vicki adams

    if he were mine I would be going back to step one,in john Chatterton 10 commandments
    I have a horse with similar problems.taking him back to facing up and standing still and spending more time saddling seems to fix the problem, some horses just can not be rushed
    no way could I have stayed on that horse, he looks confused to me

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  19. Anonymous

    Good on the rider for keeping control of himself and his mount. Regardless of the reason that the horse was trying to get rider off or warm up or stretch or whatever, the rider kept good balance and his legs hardly changed position. If I was the rider, Id probably consider riding broncos!!He was quiet and patient and kept going till the horse settled. A lot of experts will try to ascertain why the horse played up in the first place, but having no guide except for video, Id say he was just sick of being cooped up and wanted to stretch a bit before the hard work started!!

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  20. pam

    He did right. Run them out and sweat him out,I’d do some major lung and ground works with saddle and weight on him, no bit !

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  21. Valerie

    I think this that this rider is phenomenal and did all of the right things. For anyone to condemn him is silly. I commend him for his composure and how he simply rode the horse through the incident. You can tell the person videoing knew what to do and is a rider themselves because they started “clucking” when the horse began to buck, showing that had they been onboard they’d have ridden the horse forward as well!

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  22. Valerie

    Also, I have seen horses do this type of thing many times and it is almost always because the horses are young or still a bit green. The rider did not punish the horse for being a horse, but guided the horse through it. I believe he even petted the horse at one point when the horse leveled out. We can blame saddle fit and spinal adjustment and tooth pain sometimes, but it cannot be the go to for every situation! That would have to be assuming that all of the people and trainers in these videos are too stupid to actually care for their horses! STOP IT!!!!

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  23. Lauren

    My favour saying – two equestrians, three opinions!!

    So many “experts” on here.

    I think it was well sat, the horse is not fearful, he is playful. He needed to be ridden through and that’s exactly what was done!

    Reply
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    Reply

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